READINGS IN EARLY AMERICA TO 1763

56:512:504:01
TH 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm
Professor Shankman

This course examines the principal themes and developments in the English-speaking Atlantic world and the interactions between Europeans, Africans, and Indians in the region that became British North American colonies from the period before colonization to the end of Seven Years War.

 

COLLOQUIUM IN URBAN HISTORY

56:512:513:01
T 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm
Professor Mires      

This seminar will immerse graduate students in patterns of historical development of cities and suburbs as well as methods of researching and communicating metropolitan history for a variety of audiences. Focusing predominantly on the built environment and social history, the seminar will begin with a broad overview of cities in world history and then focus on cities and suburbs in the United States from c.1800 to present, including Camden and Philadelphia. Papers/projects for the seminar may take a variety of forms guided by each student’s goals and interests.

In addition to weekly video conferences for synchronous discussion (on Zoom), the seminar will include a project to recover the history of the site of Rutgers-Camden prior to urban renewal demolition of

an earlier neighborhood in the 1960s. This project will contribute to an ongoing campus initiative to better embody diversity and inclusivity in the physical environment through historical markers, public art, or other representations. Each student will individually document one block using sources such as city directories, New Jersey and U.S. Census data, maps, and newspapers.

 

READINGS IN GLOBAL HISTORY II: THE GLOBAL NINETEENTH CENTURY

56:512:535:01
W 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm
Professor Marker

In this course we will consider recent shifts in how historians have conceptualized, researched, and written about the dramatic historical transformations in Europe and the world from the end of the eighteenth century to the outbreak of World War I. Long considered the “European century,” the nineteenth century has been the object of intense critical reevaluation in recent years. Scholars have called into question canonical Eurocentric interpretations of the nineteenth century and embraced more global perspectives. Indeed, much of the current literature identifies the nineteenth century as the crucible of modern globalization and our present global condition. This course provides an in-depth exploration of this striking historiographical turn.

 

WRITING SEMINAR: CULTURAL HISTORY OF CAPITALISM

56:512:650:01
M 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm
Professor Woloson

In this research- and writing-intensive seminar, students will choose a topic related to the history of capitalism in the long 19th century (ca. 1780s-1910s) to craft an article-length piece of original scholarship. While working relatively independently, students in the seminar will meet periodically as a class, in smaller writing groups, and individually with the professor. Students will be guided step-by-step through the process of crafting a project, amassing relevant secondary sources, conducting primary research, and writing.  Open to all students who have taken 56:512:548:40 (Cultural History of Capitalism); 56:512:505:01 (Readings in Early America, 1763-1820); 56:512:506:01 (Readings in US History, 1820-1898); or 56:512:507:01 (Readings in the United States, 1898-1945).

 

ADVANCED TOPICS IN PUBLIC HISTORY: ACCESSIBILITY AND INCLUSION IN PUBLIC HISTORY AND PUBLIC LIFE

56:512:679:01
W 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm
Professor Belolan

Accessibility and inclusion for people with disabilities are essential values every public historian is expected to embrace. These values also permeate work in other fields that touch public life, including medicine, secondary education, municipal services, and architecture and design. They have become even more important during the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in fundamental changes to the way everyone accesses the world.

What is the history of accessibility and inclusion for people with disabilities and others in public life? How does that history affect how people with disabilities engage with and participate in what happens at museums, libraries, and other sites of public history and culture? What is the difference between diversity and inclusion, in theory and in practice? How are they related, historically and today? Through readings, documentaries, assessments of online public-facing programming, written reflection, and discussion with practitioners in history and adjacent fields, students will develop a holistic understanding of the many forms accessibility and inclusion have taken historically and today. This class includes a collaborative project with the New Jersey Council for the Humanities.

 

GRADUATE PUBLIC HISTORY INTERNSHIP

56:512:699:01
By Arrangement Professor Woloson

Supervised work experience in a public history office or private institutional setting, involving project work for one semester or a summer.