READINGS IN EARLY AMERICA TO 1763
56:512:504:01
W 6:00 PM – 8:50 PM 
Professor Shankman

History 504 examines the principal economic, political, social, and cultural developments in North America from pre-contact to 1763.

Issues in Public History
56:512:531:01
M 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm

This seminar will go behind the scenes of the production and communication of history in settings such as museums, historic sites, and archives, and in the digital realm. We will examine issues in public history through controversies such as the display of the Enola Gay at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., and the creation of the President’s House site exhibit in Philadelphia. Readings and discussion also will examine how civic engagement techniques and the interpretation of diverse, multiple narratives of history have come to the forefront of public history practice. (This seminar meets concurrently with the undergraduate course Introduction to Public History. Graduate students will gain familiarity with the literature of the field by developing a paper about a selected public history issue; the seminar also will offer a realistic examination of the job market and opportunities to begin to create a professional network.) A reading list will be posted during the summer at https://charlenemires.camden.rutgers.edu.

READINGS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1877
56:512:541:01
T 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm 
Professor Boyd

This course examines the principal themes and developments in African American History from the 1600s to 1877 (the end of Reconstruction). The course explores the rise and fall of slavery, resistance to slavery and the evolution of black leadership, African American roles in Reconstruction, and the development of the New South. 

Craft of History
56:512:550:01
Th 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm
Professor Jewell

The Craft of History is unique in the master’s program at Rutgers-Camden. Rather than a reading or research course in a particular area of history, this course is designed to familiarize students with major problems, questions, and methods that shape the discipline of history as a whole. In the first part of the course, we will explore how scholars have historicized the study of history itself. We’ll then consider a wide variety of competing methodological approaches to the study of the past and work through the major “historiographical turns” of the past few decades. The course will conclude with an examination of a few key historical debates, the boundaries between scholarship and fraud, and the politics of history writing today.

READINGS IN MIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION
56:512:551:01
W 2:05 pm – 4:55 pm 
Professor Thomas

In this course, we will examine the many dimensions of immigration and transnationalism in the 20th-century United States. Our readings will focus on the comparative history of immigrant groups and diasporas, though we will also explore the experience of refugees and deportees and the policies that regulated them across the 20th century.   

Methods in Global History 
56:512:554:01
M 2:05 pm – 4:55 pm
Professor Mokhberi

INDEPENDENT STUDY HISTORY
50:512:698:01;02;03
By Arrangement

Independent reading under the direction of a member of the department.

MATRICULATION CONTINUATION
50:512:800:01
By Arrangement

Continuous registration may be accomplished by enrolling for at least 3 credits in standard course offerings, including research courses, or by enrolling in this course for 0 credits. Students actively engaged in study toward their degree who are using university facilities and faculty time are expected to enroll for the appropriate credits.